20 September, 2021

Reel Georgia to Relaunch Fall 2021

In the fall of 2011, I attended my first ever Savannah Film Festival. I didn't have press credentials—in fact, I hardly even knew how to get them. Instead, I spent what little money I had to get a hotel room for one night and bought tickets to a few films and waitlisted a fourth film. I had the time of my life. While I had already started work on Reel Georgia before then, I feel like the 2011 Savannah Film Festival is actually where Reel Georgia came to life. 

By 2016, Reel Georgia had grown to a team of almost a dozen contributors and full coverage of Georgia's film industry and film festival circuit. In January of 2017, Georgia Entertainment News purchased Reel Georgia and gave us a new home. Time, work, displacement and various other factors took a toll and after a couple of years, there just wasn't much going on around these parts.

As Reel Georgia looks towards turning 10 years old next month, we are relaunching! Look out for a new website and a new look. Thank you for a decade of readership and support!

30 January, 2017

"I Am Not Your Negro" Review (*****)


Written by Christina Nicole

Raoul Peck brings to fruition the goals James Baldwin had for the book he never finished, chronicling the journeys of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr., Remember This House. This documentary, both black and white and colored, is a film that holds up a mirror to America and shows the unrelenting truth. Samuel L. Jackson narrates the documentary using Baldwin’s words. Peck connects the past and the present in every section of the film. He juxtaposes the experiences of the four main characters with that of white America in such a way that it feels like James Baldwin himself made this movie.

26 January, 2017

Three Georgia Films Nominated for 2017 Academy Awards

While Georgia’s film industry continues to expand in all directions, it is only natural that we see an increase in the presence of Georgia productions on end-of-the-year lists and in award presentations.


With the nominations for the 89th Academy Awards announced this morning, it comes as no surprise that three films made in Georgia showed up. Theodore Melfi’s “Hidden Figures,” Morten Tyldum’s “Passengers” and Clint Eastwood’s “Sully” all received nominations. No two Georgia films were nominated in the same category.

24 January, 2017

Georgia Film News Acquires Reel Georgia, Expands Coverage of the Entertainment Industry

Georgia Entertainment News (formerly Georgia Film News), the leading business publication covering Georgia’s entertainment industry, announced today the acquisition of Reel Georgia. Reel Georgia was founded in 2011 by Cameron McAllister and is a leading outlet for film professionals covering festivals, movies and news.

“When we launched, everyone said we should meet Cameron McAllister,” said Randy Davidson, President of Georgia Film News. “He has been in the industry for a long time and built a very solid following with Reel Georgia.”

Georgia Film News publishes commentary and analysis about the entertainment industry to thousands of professionals each day. The acquisition of Reel Georgia adds thousands of additional readers to the property.

“Reel Georgia has evolved over the years to focus more on festivals, industry awards and film reviews—especially those with a Georgia connection,” said Cameron McAllister CEO of Reel Georgia. “As the state’s film industry continues to explode, we looked at different ways to expand our footprint in the state. Georgia Film News is a perfect fit to build a more solid resource for entertainment professionals.”

Cameron will remain as part of the Georgia Film News team as Vice President of Content and Special Projects. A special section labeled Reel Georgia has been added to GeorgiaFilmNews.com.

“We welcome Cameron, the readers of Reel Georgia and his writing team to Georgia Film News. This is truly a positive development – not only for our publications, but for the industry,” concluded Davidson.

Cameron also serves as the Marketing Director for the Atlanta Film Society and the Executive Director for the Rome International Film Festival. He founded and presides over the Georgia Film Critics Association.

To learn more about Georgia Entertainment News and how it was started, click here.

21 December, 2016

Atlanta Film Society Announces First 14 Selections from 2017 Atlanta Film Festival


After the 40th annual Atlanta Film Festival (ATLFF) in April of 2016 saw record-breaking numbers of works submitted, festival attendees and media impressions, the Atlanta Film Society (ATLFS) immediately put plans in place to maintain the momentum. In preparation for the 41st ATLFF next spring, the organization is pleased to announce a first slate of programming comprising feature length and short films, narratives, documentaries, pilot episodes, music videos, animation, puppetry, experimental and virtual reality.

“We are really excited to release a first wave of films that represents every category of our festival programming,” said ATLFS Executive Director Christopher Escobar. “ATLFF isn’t just one thing, and by including short films, pilots and virtual reality alongside features, we are presenting a greater picture of what to expect this year.”

"American Pastoral" Review (***)

Ewan McGregor and Jennifer Connelly star in "American Pastoral."

Ewan McGregor made a bold choice in his directorial debut with "American Pastoral." Phillip Roth is easily one of the best American authors of the past 25 years. His work is beastly. McGregor attempted to tame the beast. "American Pastoral" is simply a convoluted story about a man, his family and America during the tumultuous Vietnam era—and then some.

"Lion" Review (***½)

Editor's note: I've been begging Alexandra James to write for Reel Georgia for months and months. Recently, Alex joined the team down at the Savannah Film Festival for a few days and I was able to coax her into finally writing a review. I think you'll find that both the writer and her work are equally as charismatic and approachable as they are thorough and accomplished. I am thrilled to add Alex to the Reel crew. -CM

Dev Patel stars in "Lion."

Familiar themes of displacement, familial dysfunction, a desire for resolve, and great cast performances all help Garth Davis’ debut feature film, "Lion," evoke all the feels at all the right times. "Lion" is a poignant drama that takes viewers on a laborious personal journey that, fortunately, lands in inspiration and the aforementioned resolve. Though the film successfully plays on its viewers’ emotions, it does have its shortcomings in other areas. Are these shortcomings so prominent that they distract from the truly remarkable story that the film is based on? Nah. But they are shortcomings that keep this good film from reaching the status of excellency that it seems right on the cusp of.

"Loving" Review (****½)

'Tell the judge I love my wife.' Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga star in "Loving."

Jeff Nichols shows a solemn, moving picture of Richard and Mildred Loving’s life together. Richard and Mildred Loving lived in Virginia in the 1950s. They loved each other immensely. They married in Washington D.C. shortly after discovering they were expecting a child.

Despite the marriage license—a binding legal document—cops entered their home in the middle of the night and put the Lovings in jail. Mildred spent five nights in jail; she was eight months pregnant. The law enforcement in their small country town prosecuted the Lovings because at the time, interracial marriages were against the law in Virginia. The judge forced them out of Virginia for the next 25 years, against the threat of a prison sentence.

12 November, 2016

"Tower" Review (***½)

"Tower" mixes animation with archival footage.

"Tower" follows the tragic story of the 1966 University of Texas at Austin sniper shooting. This documentary brilliantly juxtaposes live action film, radio archives, and animations to parallel the narration of both survivors and witnesses to the event.

One thing I had difficulty remembering was how unheard of school shootings were at the time. It's almost an unsettling blast from the past into just a relevant presence, but one important aspect of this film is that it does not 'glorify' the killer. "Tower" truly focuses on the heroes and survivors, while honoring the victims.

"Arrival" Review (****½)

Amy Adams stars in "Arrival."

Denis Villeneuve, one of our most consistent filmmakers, has crafted one of the best sci-fi movies of the decade with "Arrival." A slow-burn, intellectual approach keeps the story front and center—and what a story it is.

Amy Adams plays Louise Banks, a linguist whose skillset becomes invaluable when mysterious spacecrafts land around the world—twelve different ones to be exact. Hovering quietly above random locations across the globe, humanity has to make the next move. Do we attack? What do they want? Why are there twelve? These questions are only the beginning of the mystery that falls into the hands of Louise and her physicist partner Ian (Jeremy Renner).